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Direct Social Work Practice Theory and Skills10th Edition

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Empowerment Series: Direct Social Work Practice Theory and Skills 10th Edition

Author: DEAN H. HEPWORTH;
RONALD H. ROONEY;
GLENDA DEWBERRY ROONEY;
KIMBERLY STROM-GOTTFRIED.
Edition: 10th Edition
Year: 2017
Language: English
ISBN 13: 978-1-305-63380-3
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN 10: 1-305633806
LCCN : 15941189
Pages: 678
File: PDF
Price: 9.99$
Digital delivery: Via Email check your SPAM

Empowerment Series: Direct Social Work Practice Theory and Skills 10th Edition

NOTE: This book is standalone and will not include any access codes.

Considered the classic source in its field, DIRECT SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE: THEORY AND SKILLS prepares you for effective real-world practice. Packed with case examples, illustrations, and proven learning experiences from the authors and other social work practitioners, the book integrates the major theories and skills that direct social work practitioners need to understand and master. Part of the Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series, the tenth edition is completely up to date and thoroughly integrates the core competencies and recommended practice behaviors outlined in the 2015 Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) set by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

Brief Contents:

Preface
About the Authors

PART 1
INTRODUCTION
1 The Challenges and Opportunities of Social Work
2 Direct Practice: Domain, Philosophy, and Roles
3 Overview of the Helping Process
4 Operationalizing the Cardinal Social Work Values

PART 2
EXPLORING, ASSESSING, AND PLANNING
5 Building Blocks of Communication: Conveying Empathy and Authenticity
6 Verbal Following, Exploring, and Focusing Skills
7 Eliminating Counterproductive Communication Patterns and Substituting Positive Alternatives
8 Assessment: Exploring and Understanding Problems and Strengths
9 Assessment: Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental Factors
10 Assessing Family Functioning in Diverse Family and Cultural Contexts
11 Forming and Assessing Social Work Groups
12 Developing Goals and Formulating a Contract

PART 3
THE CHANGE-ORIENTED PHASE
13 Planning and Implementing Change-Oriented Strategies
14 Developing Resources, Advocacy, and Organizing as Intervention Strategies
15 Enhancing Family Functioning and Relationships
16 Intervening in Social Work Groups
17 Additive Empathy, Interpretation, and Confrontation
18 Managing Barriers to Change

PART 4
THE TERMINATION PHASE
19 The Final Phase: Evaluation and Termination
Bibliography
Author Index
Subject Index

Table of Contents:

Preface
About the Authors

PART 1
INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1
The Challenges and Opportunities of Social
Work
The Context of Social Work
The Mission of Social Work
The Purposes of Social Work
Social Work Values
EPAS Competencies
EPAS Competency 1
EPAS Competency 2
EPAS Competency 3
EPAS Competency 4
EPAS Competency 5
EPAS Competency 6 11
EPAS Competencies 7 and 8
EPAS Competency 9
Levels of Practice
Orienting Frameworks to Achieve Competencies
Ecological Systems Model
Nonlinear Applications of Systems Theory
Limitations of Systems Theories
Deciding on and Carrying Out Interventions
Evidence-Based Practice
Criticism of Evidence Approaches and Alternatives
Guidelines Influencing Intervention Selection
Summary
Competency Notes

CHAPTER 2
Direct Practice: Domain, Philosophy, and Roles
Domain
Generalist Practice
Direct Practice
A Philosophy of Direct Practice
Roles of Direct Practitioners
Direct Provision of Services
System Linkage Roles
System Maintenance and Enhancement
Researcher/Research Consumer
System Development
Summary
Competency Notes

CHAPTER 3
Overview of the Helping Process
Common Elements among Diverse Theorists and Social Workers
The Helping Process
Phase I: Exploration, Engagement, Assessment, and Planning
Phase II: Implementation and Goal Attainment
Phase III: Termination
The Interviewing Process: Structure and Skills
Physical Conditions
Structure of Interviews
The Exploration Process
Focusing in Depth
Negotiating Goals and a Contract
Ending Interviews
Goal Attainment
Summary
Competency Notes
Notes

CHAPTER 4
Operationalizing the Cardinal Social Work
Values
The Interaction between Personal and Professional Values
The Cardinal Values of Social Work
Access to Resources
Respect for Dignity and Worth and Interpersonal
Relationships
The Value of Integrity
The Value of Competence
Challenges in Embracing the Profession’s Values
Ethics
The Intersection of Laws and Ethics
Key Ethical Principles
What Are the Limits on Confidentiality?
Confidentiality in Various Types of Recording
The Ethics of Practice with Minors
Understanding and Resolving Ethical Dilemmas
Steps in Ethical Decision Making
Applying the Ethical Decision-Making Model
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Operationalizing Cardinal Values
Client Statements
Modeled Social Worker Responses
Skill Development Exercises in Managing Ethical Dilemmas
PART 2
EXPLORING, ASSESSING, AND PLANNING

CHAPTER 5
Building Blocks of Communication: Conveying
Empathy and Authenticity
Roles of the Participants
Determine Your Client’s Expectations
Emphasize Client Responsibility
Emphasize Difficulties Inherent in Process
Clarify Your Own Role
Children as Participants
Communicating about Informed Consent, Confidentiality, and Agency Policies
Facilitative Conditions
Empathic Communication
Developing Perceptiveness to Feelings
Affective Words and Phrases
Using the Lists of Affective Words and Phrases
Exercises in Identifying Surface and Underlying Feelings
Accurately Conveying Empathy
Empathic Communication Scale
Exercises in Discriminating Levels of Empathic Responding
Responding with Reciprocal Empathy
Constructing Reciprocal Responses
Employing Empathic Responding
Multiple Uses of Empathic Communication
Teaching Clients to Respond Empathically
Authenticity
Types of Self-Disclosure
Timing and Intensity of Self-Disclosure
A Paradigm for Responding Authentically
Guidelines for Responding Authentically
Cues for Authentic Responding
Positive Feedback: A Form of Authentic
Responding
Relating Assertively to Clients
Making Requests and Giving Directives
Maintaining Focus and Managing Interruptions
Interrupting Problematic Processes
“Leaning Into” Clients’ Anger
Saying No and Setting Limits
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Empathic Communication
Client Statements
Modeled Social Worker Responses
Skill Development Exercises in Responding Authentically and Assertively
Client Statements
Modeled Social Worker Responses
Answers to Exercise in Identifying Surface and Underlying Feelings
Answers to Exercises to Discriminate Levels of Empathic Responding

CHAPTER 6
Verbal Following, Exploring, and Focusing Skills
Maintaining Psychological Contact with Clients and Exploring Their Problems
Verbal Following Skills
Furthering Responses
Minimal Prompts
Accent Responses
Reflection Responses
Reflections of Content
Exercises in Reflection of Content
Reflections of Affect
Exercises with Reflections of Affect
Closed- and Open-Ended Responses
Exercises in Identifying Closed- and Open-Ended Responses
Discriminant Use of Closed- and Open-Ended Responses
Seeking Concreteness
Types of Responses That Facilitate Specificity of Expression by Clients
Specificity of Expression by Social Workers
Exercises in Seeking Concreteness
Providing and Maintaining Focusing
Selecting Topics for Exploration
Exploring Topics in Depth
Managing Obstacles to Focusing
Summarizing Responses
Highlighting Key Aspects of Problems, Strengths, and Resources
Summarizing Lengthy Messages
Reviewing Focal Points of a Session
Providing Focus and Continuity
Analyzing Your Verbal Following Skills
Summary
Competency Notes
Modeled Social Worker Responses to Exercises in Reflection of Content
Modeled Social Worker Responses to Exercises with Reflection of Affect
Answers to Exercises in Identifying Closed- and Open-Ended Responses
Modeled Social Worker Responses to Exercises in Identifying Closed- and Open-Ended Responses
Modeled Social Worker Responses to Exercises in Seeking Concreteness
Note

CHAPTER 7
Eliminating Counterproductive Communication Patterns and Substituting Positive Alternatives
Impacts of Counterproductive Communication Patterns
Identifying and Improving Nonverbal Barriers to Effective Communication
Physical Attending
Cultural Nuances of Nonverbal Cues
Other Nonverbal Behaviors
Taking Inventory of Nonverbal Patterns of Responding
Eliminating Verbal Barriers to Communication
Reassuring, Sympathizing, Consoling, or Excusing
Advising and Giving Suggestions or Solutions Prematurely
Using Sarcasm or Employing Humor Inappropriately
Judging, Criticizing, or Placing Blame
Trying to Convince Clients about the Right Point of View through Logic, Lecturing, Instructing or Arguing
Analyzing, Diagnosing, or Making Glib or Dogmatic Interpretations
Threatening, Warning, or Counterattacking
Stacking Questions and Using Double-Barreled Questions
Asking Leading Questions
Interrupting Inappropriately or Excessively
Dominating the Interaction
Keeping Discussions Focused on Safe Topics
Responding Infrequently
Parroting or Overusing Certain Phrases or Clichés
Dwelling on the Remote Past
Going on Fishing Expeditions (Tangential Exploration)
Failing to Be Aware of Cognitive Bias
Gauging the Effectiveness of Your Responses
The Challenge of Learning New Skills
Summary
Competency Notes
Note

CHAPTER 8
Assessment: Exploring and Understanding Problems and Strengths
The Multidimensionality of Assessment
Defining Assessment: Process and Product
Assessment: Focus and Timing
Priorities in Assessments
Assessment and Diagnosis
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5)
Culturally Competent Assessment
The Person-in-Environment
Emphasizing Strengths in Assessments
The Role of Knowledge in Assessments
The Role of Theory in Assessments
Caveats about Using Knowledge and Theories
Sources of Information for Assessments
Enactment
Client Self-Monitoring
Collateral Contacts
Assessment Instruments
Social Worker’s Personal Experience
Questions to Answer in Problem Assessment
Getting Started
Identifying the Problem, Its Expressions, and Other Critical Concerns
The Interaction of Other People or Systems
Assessing Needs and Wants
Typical Wants Involved in Presenting Problems
Stresses Associated with Life Transitions
Cultural, Societal, and Social Class Factors
The severity of the Problem
Meanings That Clients Ascribe to Problems
Sites of Problematic Behaviors
Temporal Context of Problematic Behaviors
Frequency of Problematic Behaviors
Duration of the Problem
Other Issues Affecting Client Functioning
Emotional Reactions
Coping Efforts and Needed Skills
Support Systems
Resources Needed
Assessing Children and Older Adults
Data Sources and Interviewing Techniques
Maltreatment
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Exploring Strengths and Problems
Note

CHAPTER 9
Assessment: Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Environmental Factors
The Interaction of Multiple Systems in Human Problems
Intrapersonal Systems
Assessing Biophysical Functioning
Physical Characteristics and Presentation
Physical Health
Assessing Use and Abuse of Medications, Alcohol, and Drugs
Assessing Cognitive/Perceptual Functioning
Intellectual Functioning
Judgment
Reality Testing
Coherence
Cognitive Flexibility
Values
Beliefs
Self-Concept
Assessing Affective Functioning
Emotional Control
Range of Emotions
Appropriateness of Affect
Suicidal Risk
Depression and Suicidal Risk with Children and Adolescents
Depression and Suicidal Risk with Older Adults
Assessing Behavioral Functioning
Risk of Aggression
Assessing Motivation
Assessing Environmental Systems
Physical Environment
Social Support Systems
Spirituality and Affiliation with a Faith Community
Written Assessments
Biopsychosocial Assessments
Case Notes
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Assessment
Notes

CHAPTER 10
Assessing Family Functioning in Diverse Family and Cultural Contexts
Defining Family and Family Functions
Self-Awareness in Family Assessment
The Family Systems Framework
Homeostasis
Boundaries and Boundary Maintenance
Family Decision Making, Hierarchy, and Power
Family Roles
Communication Styles of Family Members
Family Life Cycle
Family Rules
Social Environment
Family Adaptive Capacity
Assessment Skills and Strategies
Observing Patterns of Interaction
Interviewing Skills and Circular Questioning
Genograms
Standardized Scales
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Assessing Families

CHAPTER 11
Forming and Assessing Social Work Groups
Classification of Groups
Treatment Group Subtypes
Self-Help Groups
Task Group Subtypes
The Evidence Base for Groups
Formation of Treatment Groups
Identifying the Need for the Group
Establishing the Group Purpose
Deciding on Leadership
Determining Group Composition
Choosing an Open or Closed Group
Determining Group Size and Location
Setting the Frequency and Duration of Meetings
Conducting Preliminary Interviews
Determining the Group Structure
Formulating Preliminary Group Guidelines
Assessing Group Processes
A Systems Framework for Assessing Groups
Assessing Individuals’ Patterned Behaviors
Identifying Roles of Group Members
Assessing Individuals’ Cognitions and Behaviors
Assessing the Group’s Patterned Behaviors
Assessing Group Alliances
Assessing Group Norms
Assessing Group Cohesion
Single-Session Groups
Formation of Task Groups
Task Group Purpose
Task Group Membership and Planning
Beginning the Task Group
Cultural Considerations in Forming and Assessing Task or Treatment Groups
Ethics in Practice with Task or Treatment Groups
Informed Consent, Confidentiality, and Self-Determination
Competence
Nondiscrimination
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Planning Groups

CHAPTER 12
Developing Goals and Formulating a Contract
Goals
The Purpose and Function of Goals
Linking Goals to Target Concerns
Distinguishing Program Objectives and Client Goals
Factors Influencing Goal Development
Types of Goals
Guidelines for Selecting and Defining Goals
Goals Must Relate to the Desired Results Sought by Voluntary Clients
Goals for Involuntary Clients Should Include Motivational Congruence
Goals Should Be Defined in Explicit and Measurable Terms
Goals Must Be Feasible
Goals Should Be Commensurate with the Knowledge and Skills of the Practitioner
Goals Should Be Stated in Positive Terms That Emphasize Growth
Avoid Agreeing to Goals about Which You Have Major Reservations
Goals Should Be Consistent with the Functions of the Agency
Applying Goal Selection and Development Guidelines with Minors
Eliciting Minors’ Understanding of the Goal and Point of View of the Problem and Using This Information to Assist Them to Develop Goals
Is the Minor Voluntary or Involuntary?
Definition and Specifications of the Behavior to Be Changed
The Process of Negotiating Goals
Determine Clients’ Readiness for Goal Negotiation
Explain the Purpose and Function of Goals
Jointly Select Appropriate Goals
Define Goals Explicitly and Specify Level of Change
Determine Potential Barriers to Goal Attainment and Discuss Benefits and Risks
Assist Clients in Making a Clear Choice about Committing Themselves to Specific Goals
Rank Goals According to Client Priorities
Monitoring Progress and Evaluation
Methods of Monitoring and Evaluating Progress
Quantitative Measurements
Qualitative Measurements
Combining Methods for Measuring and Evaluating
Evaluating Your Practice
Contracts
The Rationale for Contracts
Formal and Informal Contracts
Developing Contracts
Sample Contracts
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Developing Goals
Notes
PART 3
THE CHANGE-ORIENTED PHASE

CHAPTER 13
Planning and Implementing Change-Oriented Strategies
Change-Oriented Approaches
Planning Goal Attainment Strategies
Is the Approach Appropriate for Addressing the Problem and the Service Goals?
What Empirical or Conceptual Evidence Supports the Effectiveness of the Approach?
Is the Approach Compatible with Basic Values and Ethics of Social Work?
Am I Sufficiently Knowledgeable and Skilled Enough in This Approach to Use It with Others?
Models and Techniques of Practice
The Task-Centered Model
Tenets of the Task-Centered Approach
Theoretical Framework of the Task-Centered Model
Evidence Base and Use of the Task-Centered Model
Utilization of the Task-Centered Model with Minors
Application of the Task-Centered Model with Diverse Groups
Procedures of the Task-Centered Model
Developing General Tasks
Developing Specific Tasks
Task Implementation Sequence
Failure to Complete Tasks
Monitoring Progress
Strengths and Limitations of the Task-Centered Model
The Crisis Intervention Model
Tenets of the Crisis Intervention Equilibrium Model
Definition of Crisis
Crisis Reactions and Stages
Duration of Contact and Focus
Intervening with Minors
Benefits of a Crisis
Theoretical Framework of Crisis Intervention
Evidence Base and Use of Crisis Intervention
Application of Crisis Intervention with Diverse Groups
Procedures of Crisis Intervention
Strengths and Limitations of the Strategy
Cognitive Restructuring
Theoretical Framework
Tenets of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Cognitive Restructuring
Cognitive Distortions
Cognitive Schemas
Empirical Evidence and Uses of Cognitive Restructuring
Using Cognitive Restructuring with Minors
Applying Cognitive Restructuring with Diverse Groups
Procedures of Cognitive Restructuring
Strengths, Limitations, and Cautions of the Approach
Solution-Focused Brief Treatment Model
Tenets of the Solution-Focused Brief Treatment Model
Theoretical Framework
Empirical Evidence and Uses of Solution-Focused Strategies
Utilization with Minors
Application of Solution-Focused Approach with Diverse Groups
Solution-Focused Procedures and Techniques
Strengths and Limitations of the Approach
Case Management
Tenets of Case Management
Standards of Case Management Practice
Empirical Evidence of Case Management
Case Management Functions
Case Managers
Strengths and Limitations
Trauma-Informed Care: An Overview of Concepts, Principles, and Resources
Defining Trauma
The Effects of Trauma
Prevalence of Trauma: What Is Known
Trauma-Informed Care
Six Key Principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach and Trauma-Informed Care
The Need for a Trauma-Informed Service Approach
Evidence of the Approach
Implications for Social Work Practice
Trauma-Informed Resources
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Planning and Implementing Change-Oriented Strategies
Note

CHAPTER 14
Developing Resources, Advocacy, and Organizing as Intervention Strategies
Social Work’s Commitment
Defining Macro Practice
Linking Micro and Macro Practice
Macro Practice Intervention Strategies
Theories and Perspectives
Empowerment and Strengths
Selecting a Strategy
General Assessment Questions
Developing and Mobilizing Resources
Determining and Documenting Needs
Developing Resources with Diverse Groups
Mobilizing Community Resources
Engaging in Advocacy and Social Action
Case and Cause Advocacy
Advocacy and Social Action Defined
Indications for Advocacy or Social Action
Competence and Skills for Social Action
Ethical Principles for Social Action and Advocacy
Techniques and Steps of Advocacy and Social Action
Improving the Organizational Environment
Organizational Policies or Practices and Staff Behavior That Fail to Promote Client Dignity and Worth
Promoting Dignity and Worth
Institutionalized Racism and Discrimination
Cultural Competence at the Organizational Level
Engaging in Community Organization
Models and Strategies of Community Intervention
Steps and Skills of Community Intervention
Ethical Issues in Community Organizing
Social Media as a Resource for Social Advocacy and Community Organizing
Macro Practice Evaluation
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Developing Resources, Advocacy, and Organizing as Intervention Strategies

CHAPTER 15
Enhancing Family Functioning and Relationships
Intervention Approaches with Families
Family Engagement
Who Should Participate?
Cultural Perspectives on Engagement
Orchestrating the Initial Family or Couple Session
Family Interventions
First-Order Change Strategies
Problem-Solving Approaches
Skills Training
Contingency Contracting
Second-Order Change Strategies
Modifying Misconceptions and Distorted Cognitions
Modifying Communication Patterns
Modifying Family Rules
Modifying Family Alignments and Hierarchy
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Enhancing Family Functioning and Relationships

CHAPTER 16
Intervening in Social Work Groups
Stages of Group Development
Stage 1. Preaffiliation: Approach and Avoidance Behavior
Stage 2. Power and Control: A Time of Transition
Stage 3. Intimacy: Developing a Familial Frame of Reference
Stage 4. Differentiation: Developing Group Identity and an Internal Frame of Reference
Stage 5. Separation: Breaking Away
The Leader’s Role Throughout the Group
Interventions Throughout the Life of the Group
Fostering Cohesion
Addressing Group Norms
Intervening with Members’ Roles
Attending to Subgroup Structure
Using the Leadership Role Purposefully
Attending to Group and Individual Processes
Stage-Specific Interventions
Interventions in the Preaffiliation Stage
Interventions in the Power and Control Stage
Interventions in the Intimacy and Differentiation Stages
Interventions in the Termination Stage
Errors in Group Interventions
Variations in Social Work with Groups
Single-Session Groups
Technology-Mediated Groups
Interventions with Task Groups
Preaffiliation
Power and Control
Working Phase
Termination Phase
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Group Interventions
Client Statements
Modeled Social Worker Responses
Note

CHAPTER 1 7
Additive Empathy, Interpretation, and Confrontation
The Meaning and Significance of Client Self-Awareness
Additive Empathy and Interpretation
Deeper Feelings
Underlying Meanings of Feelings, Thoughts, and Behavior
Wants and Goals
Hidden Purposes of Behavior
Challenging Beliefs Stated as Facts
Unrealized Strengths and Potentialities
Guidelines for Employing Interpretation and Additive Empathy
Confrontation
Self-Confrontation
Assertive Confrontation
Guidelines for Employing Confrontation
Indications for Assertive Confrontation
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Additive Empathy and Interpretation
Skill Development Exercises in Confrontation
Note

CHAPTER 18
Managing Barriers to Change
Barriers to Change
Relational Dynamics
The Importance of Reciprocal Positive Feelings
Steps to Take to Reduce the Risk of Negative Relational Dynamics
Under- and Overinvolvement of Social Workers with Clients
Burnout, Compassion Fatigue, and Vicarious Trauma
Reactions of Clients: Assessing Potential Barriers and Intervening
Pathological or Inept Social Workers
Cross-Racial and Cross-Cultural Barriers
Difficulties in Establishing Trust
Transference Reactions
Managing Countertransference Reactions
Realistic Practitioner Reactions
Sexual Attraction toward Clients
Motivating Change
Overcoming Resistance
Reactance Theory
Change Strategies
Motivational Interviewing
Guiding Principles of Motivational Interviewing
Positive Connotation
Redefining Problems as Opportunities for Growth
Therapeutic Binds
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Managing Relational Dynamics
Skill Development Exercises in Managing Relational Reactions and Opposition
PART 4
THE TERMINATION PHASE

CHAPTER 19
The Final Phase: Evaluation and Termination
Evaluation
Outcomes
Process
Satisfaction
Hybrid Models
Termination
Types of Termination
Understanding and Responding to Clients’ Termination Reactions
Social Workers’ Reactions to Termination
Consolidating Gains and Planning Maintenance Strategies
Follow-Up Sessions
Ending Rituals
Summary
Competency Notes
Skill Development Exercises in Evaluation and Termination
Notes

Bibliography
Author Index
Subject Index

About the Authors:

Dean H. Hepworth is Professor Emeritus at the School of Social Work, Arizona State University, Tempe Arizona, and the University of Utah. Dean has extensive practice experience in individual psychotherapy and marriage and family therapy. Dean was the lead author and active in the production of the first four editions, and he is the co-author of Improving Therapeutic Communication. He is now retired and lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
Ronald H. Rooney is a Professor at the School of Social Work, University of Minnesota. Dr. Rooney is also the author of Strategies for Work with Involuntary Clients. His experience includes practice, consultation, and training in child welfare and works with involuntary clients. He has made international presentations in Canada, Great Britain, Holland, Korea, Taiwan, and Australia.
Glenda Dewberry Rooney is a Professor Emeritus, Department of Social Work, Augsburg College, Minneapolis, Minnesota. She taught undergraduate and graduate direct practice courses, ethics, research, and organization and administration. Her practice experience includes child welfare, mental health, and work with families and children. In addition to her practice experience, she has been involved with agencies concerned with children, youth, and families as a trainer and as the clinical, program, and management consultant, and in community-based research projects. Active in retirement, Dr. Rooney continues as an advocate for child welfare policies and practices that strengthen and support children and families. She was one of the statewide leaders involved with the Affordable Care Act’s education efforts and enrollment periods.
Dr. Kim Strom-Gottfried is the Smith P. Theimann Jr. Distinguished Professor of Ethics and Professional Practice at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Dr. Strom-Gottfried teaches in the areas of direct practice, higher education, and management. Her scholarly interests involve ethics, moral courage, and social work education. She is the author of Straight Talk about Professional Ethics, The Ethics of Practice with Minors, and the forthcoming book Cultivating Courage. Dr. Strom-Gottfried is also the co-author of the texts Best of Boards and Teaching Social Work Values and Ethics: A Curriculum Resource.
Craig Schwalbe, MSW, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the Columbia University School of Social Work. Dr. Schwalbe began his career with more than 10 years of direct practice in child welfare and mental health agency settings. His current scholarship focuses on the development of evidence-based strategies to foster successful juvenile justice interventions on behalf of court-involved youths. He was the recipient of the William T. Grant Scholars award in 2009, which funded a study of success and failure on probation, and co-led a UNICEF-funded international development effort to design and implement juvenile diversion programs for delinquent youths in Jordan. His current scholarship promotes community-based alternatives to detention and incarceration for adolescent juvenile offenders.
Pa Der Vang, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the St. Catherine University/St. Thomas University School of Social Work in St. Paul, Minnesota. She earned her master’s and Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Minnesota–Twin Cities. Her area of research involves refugees and immigrants. Her area of teaching is primarily direct practice with individuals, families, and groups.
Caroline B. R. Evans is a Research Associate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is currently working on a federally funded youth violence prevention initiative. Her practice experience includes extensive work with the Latino/Hispanic population in a hospital setting and in various outpatient community mental health settings. She has also worked with children and adolescents involved with the juvenile court system.

Reviews about the ebook:

  • Julieann Peters:
    This is a great first-year MSW Social Workbook. Easy to understand sometimes repetitive in nature. Applicable to MSW licensure regulation.
  • Poha Sonoda-Burgess:
    Thank you for the speedy delivery! I greatly appreciate your hard work.
  • Mish:
    This book is clear, interesting, and detailed. It is thorough and my only regret is that I rented it rather than buying it.
  • Sarah:
    I originally rented this book for an Undergrad Social Work class, in the middle of my first semester, I ended up finding it brand new to purchase for even less than I paid to rent it! I am now in Grad School and was required to use the book again and I continuously use it as a reference and source for writing papers. Definitely worth purchasing rather than renting if you are a Social Work student!

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Author:

DEAN H. HEPWORTH;
RONALD H. ROONEY;
GLENDA DEWBERRY ROONEY;
KIMBERLY STROM-GOTTFRIED.

Edition:

10th Edition

Year:

2017

Language:

English

ISBN 13:

978-1-305-63380-3

Publisher:

Cengage Learning

ISBN 10:

1-305633806

LCCN :

15941189

Pages:

678

File:

PDF

Digital delivery:

Via Email

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